History

In 1970, a group of caring women from the Junior League of Johnson and Wyandotte Counties started the “Wyandotte House” because they saw children in need.Wyandotte House eventually grew, with Logan House added in 1974 and Kiely House in 1976, and became Kaw Valley Center. wyandottehouse

In 1987, with the help of federal funding from Senator Robert Dole and the efforts of the late Mayor Jack Reardon, KVC’s Psychiatric Hospital, sitting on a 75-acre campus in Kansas City, Kansas, was dedicated. Since then, the hospital has provided a professional and effective, family-friendly treatment environment. KVC adopted a philosophy of “no reject-no eject” admissions, representing the intent not to turn a child or family away.

The Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services (SRS), initiated the privatization of the state’s child welfare services in 1996 and selected KVC as one of its initial lead contractors. KVC remains a primary contractor and a significant partner with the Kansas Department for Children and Families (formerly SRS and now DCF) and continually raises the bar in its provision of child welfare services, with broad experience in both urban and rural communities. KVC Staff provide case management services geared towards the achievement of safe and timely permanency for children and families. Aftercare is provided for a full year to ensure safety and stability.

USmapIn the early 2000’s, Kaw Valley Center started expanding beyond the state of Kansas. Currently we serve children and families in Nebraska, West Virginia, Kentucky, and Kansas, as well as Washington, D.C. In 2003, Kaw Valley Center became KVC Behavioral Healthcare to bring our name in line with the scope of our work. A few years later, the parent organization KVC Health Systems was created, which has several subsidiaries such as KVC Kansas and KVC Hospitals that provide direct services to children and families.

KVC opened Wheatland Psychiatric Hospital in 2010 in Hays, Kansas to provide acute inpatient services to children and adolescents in central and western Kansas.

KVC’s rich history has enabled us to grow and represent one of the strongest child welfare/behavioral healthcare continuums of care in the nation. This allows KVC to meet the needs of any child and family requiring behavioral health treatment, no matter how significant.  Since 2005, KVC Kansas has successfully matched over 2,000 children with adoptive families and have reintegrated over 4,000 children back into their homes.